French Silk Pie Recipe = Happy Belated Birthday!

This recipe comes to you from Epicurian.com

http://recipes.epicurean.com/recipe/22300/french-silk-pie.html Retrieved August 10, 2013

This confection of French Silk Pie, which I made three years ago for the weekly dinner, where I am often a guest, is very easy to make.  This year, Chris, the May Groom-to-be and now husband of the lovely Crissy was promised a chocolate pie for a birthday gift.  Chris repeatedly asked me for this scrumptious dessert.

Somewhat belatedly, I will give the pie to him today. (Okay. I know his birthday is in April and the pie is made in August, but hey, it’s a month that starts with an “A”. Perfectly justifiable for a guy born on April Fools Day.)

This morning there I was cooking my oatmeal and in the meantime, putting the ingredients together – all non-fattening – for this pie, when the pie superseded my desire for oatmeal. (Hmm? Could it be that the chocolate melting with butter, sugar and cream on the stove has eclipsed my oatmeal? Darned straight, it did.) I used a graham cracker crust. No baking needed.*

Here is the most decadent recipe for French Silk Pie that will have the chocolate lovers requesting, “Some more, please?” This is not your fluffy chocolate pie, this is some serious chocolate.  I used Baker’s Semisweet chocolate and it never fails.

Ingredients:

1 cup whipping cream

1 6-ounce package semisweet chocolate pieces

1/3 cup butter

1/3 cup sugar

2 beaten egg yolks

3 tablespoons creme de cacao or whipping cream

1 baked 8-or 9-inch pastry shell

Whipped cream (optional)

Chocolate curls or miniature chocolate pieces (optional)

Directions:

In a heavy 2-quart saucepan combine the 1-cup whipping cream, chocolate pieces, butter, and sugar.

Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until chocolate is melted. This should take about 10 minutes.

Remove saucepan from heat.

Gradually stir about half of the hot mixture into the beaten egg yolks.

Return egg mixture to saucepan.

Cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture is slightly thickened and nearly bubbly. This should take 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove saucepan from heat. (Mixture may appear to separate.)

Stir in creme de cacao or whipping cream.

Place saucepan in a bowl of ice water; stir occasionally until mixture stiffens and becomes hard to stir (20 minutes).

Transfer chocolate mixture to a medium mixing bowl.

Beat the cooled chocolate mixture with an electric mixer on medium to high speed for 2 to 3 minutes or until light and fluffy.

Spread filling in a baked pastry shell.

Cover and chill pie about 5 hours or until set, or for up to 24 hours.

At serving time, top each serving with whipped cream and sprinkle with chocolate curls or pieces, if desired.

Servings: 10

(Seriously, I doubt that this 9-inch pie will feed 10 people.)

Chris with French silk Pie

Chris with French Silk Pie


* (I am not responsible for cholesterol counts going up, except my own.)

 

About kunstkitchen

Visual artist and writer hunting words, languages, visions, and insight in my kitchen - connecting Art (Kunst) and culture and slow food cooking. Credits: Do not own a microwave oven and never have. Do not own a food processor. Chopped veggies in a Zen monastery for a weekend. (Seriously) Classically trained artist. Paint and draw with traditional materials. Live in the Northland where it's six months of winter. Appreciate the little things in life. Sharing food and art experiences and the lessons that my talented and generous friends have given me.
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