Hung Lay Thai Curry = Craving the Flavors of Thai Cuisine

Before the blog bug bit me, I was watching cooking shows and wanted to try some of the recipes. Not being known for prudence or enough patience to take a cooking course, I called Richard and asked him the best place to buy Thai ingredients around the neighborhood.  United Noodle came up in the list and there are quite a few Asian groceries on Eat Street, that’s Nicollet Avenue in Minneapolis just south of downtown central.  United Noodle is large enough and well organized to make shopping easy.  It’s over near Coastal Sea Food, which is a place to buy everything fresh that lives in water, like fish and scallops. It is on Minnehaha Avenue. Okay, before I get off track, I moseyed over to the Asian store armed with the Hung Lay Thai Curry recipe I found online.

When I walked in the cashier smiled at me.  Oh relief, friendly people.  The quest for the ingredients had me reading labels like the pro (or obsessive) that I am.  The list was long and at points I asked other friendly customers what something was, because I have not and never will master the Chinese, Korean, Thai or Japanese languages.  Eventually, after checking all points of the store and resisting urges to buy cookies, I made my way back home.

There I put together the Hung Lay Thai Curry Recipe with lamb. (This was before the “verboten” sign went up in my life about meat.)  I used that very nice la Croix lamb.  A rare sheep from the islands from Blue Gentian Farm bought at the Farmer’s Market.  This recipe calls for 2 pounds 0f meat. The first list of ingredients is for the fearless.  I opted for red curry paste substitute*.  There were enough new ingredients in the second half of the recipe to entertain a moment of, “Did I really think I could make this complicated a recipe?” Well, I did. And I did it.

I saw this recipe made on Tommy Tang’s Easy Thai cooking on PBS.  (See. See what public TV did! It made me cook.)  Tommy only used one selection of meat in his recipe.

Searching the Internet I found this recipe included below. It was the closest one to what Tommy Tang did on TV.  Spoil yourself! Try it!

By Come-In House Restaurant

http://northernthailand.com/cm/restaurants/come-in/index.html Retrieved September 25, 2010

CURRY PASTE INGREDIENTS *(You may Substitute CURRY PASTE INGREDIENTS with Pang or Red curry paste)

1 TBSP DICED GALANGA

2 TBSP DICED LEMON GRASS

1 TEASP WHOLE CORIANDER SEEDS

1 TBSP SLICED KAFFIR LIME RIND OR LEAVES

6 WHOLE SEEDED DRIED CHILI (SOAKED IN WARM WATER FOR 1 HOUR)

6 CLOVES GARLIC

6 WHOLE SMALL SHALLOTS

1 TEASP CINNAMON POWDER

1 TEASP STAR ANISE POWDER

1 TEASP SHRIMP PASTE (OPTIONAL)

MARINATE INGREDIENTS

2 LBS CHICKEN, PORK, BEEF, OR LAMB (CUT INTO 1″ INCH CUBES)

1/4 CUP CURRY POWDER

1 TEASP TURMERIC POWDER

2 TBSP SWEET BLACK BEAN SAUCE

1/4 CUP OLIVE OR VEGETABLE OIL

1/4 CUP RED CURRY OR PANANG CURRY PASTE

2-3 CUPS VEGETABLE STOCK OR FRESH WATER

3/4 CUP TAMARIND JUICE

3 TBSP PALM SUGAR, BROWN SUGAR, HONEY

4 TBSP THAI FISH SAUCE SEASONING

1 CUP UNSALTED RAW PEANUT (OPTIONAL)

16 CLOVES SMALL PICKLE OR REGULAR GARLIC (HALF CUP)

1/4 CUP THINLY SLICED GINGER

Pound curry paste ingredients in a mortar and pestle or place in a food processor to blend until it become paste or you can buy a jar of red or panang curry paste, it will do.

Next, place meat of choice into a large bowl and add curry powder, turmeric and sweet black bean sauce. Rub the meat until it is thoroughly coated and set aside for 20 minutes.

Place oil into a large deep skillet over high heat, add curry paste and stir for a minute, until you be able to see red color from the curry paste appear. Add marinated meat and stir for 2-3 minutes, then add remaining ingredients and bring to boil. Reduced heat to low, cover the skillet and simmer for at least 1 hour or until meat is soft and tender.

Your comments or questions are welcome!

About kunstkitchen

Visual artist and writer hunting words, languages, visions, and insight in my kitchen - connecting Art (Kunst) and culture and slow food cooking. Credits: Do not own a microwave oven and never have. Do not own a food processor. Chopped veggies in a Zen monastery for a weekend. (Seriously) Classically trained artist. Paint and draw with traditional materials. Live in the Northland where it's six months of winter. Appreciate the little things in life. Sharing food and art experiences and the lessons that my talented and generous friends have given me.
This entry was posted in Meat, Slow food and art in the kitchen and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s